NSSF http://www.gunvote.org

BHA Survive


Digital Daily Gun News Website

BREAKING :
The survivors of the Rancho Tehama shooting are suing the industry that they say allowed Kevin Neal to kill five people, and injure 18 others. After a domestic violence arrest, Neal was banned from having guns. So he built his murder weapons -- two homemade AR-15 style rifles called ghost guns. So-called ghost gun companies sell parts that can be assembled into these weapons. As long as those parts are 80% complete or less... normal gun laws do not apply.Moments after firing a gun for the first time, Alicea Burton proudly displayed the result of her marksmanship: a human silhouette target perforated with more than two dozen 9 mm holes.On the third anniversary of the tragic February 2018 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, President Joe Biden issued his administration’s first significant push for new gun control measures.It’s widely understood that the current occupants of the White House, the Biden-Harris Administration, have positioned themselves as the most anti-gun team this country has ever seen on Pennsylvania Avenue. Leading up to the 2020 election, NRA made abundantly clear the threats these two presented to law-abiding gun owners, and both the President and Vice President spelled out how deeply opposed they each are to the fundamental right to purchase, possess, and carry firearms for personal protection.TN Gov. Bill Lee is renewing his push to allow handguns to be carried in public without a permit, and local law enforcement leaders are pushing back with renewed opposition. Lee announced during his recent State of the State address that he will push again for the legislation, which failed to make it through the Tennessee General Assembly’s COVID-shortened session last year.

Parkland Was an Inside Job

Despite the threats from liberal Democrats, gun control may have run its course

Three years ago Nicholas Cruz, a former student at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School wandered through the halls and classrooms he briefly attended and opened fire in a mass shooting that killed 17 students and teachers and sparked a gun control resistance movement authored by grown-ups and adult professionals who used the horrible massacre as another launch pad opportunity for modern gun control. Who, or what, do you blame: Cruz, the former/sometimes student? The gun, an AR-15 rifle? The school, which should have prepared for mass killings – Remember, Parkland wasn’t the first; that title was achieved in Colorado at Columbine High School by two former students April – 20, 1999. Similar shootings have followed.  We’re all pretty much familiar with the schools and the criminals involved at Virginia Tech, Sandy Hook (CT), Umpqua (OR), Santa Fe (TX), etc.

Beginning last year, this publication briefly began a section entitled K-12 GUN HEADLINES that profiled a significant number of high schools where some students have been found carrying guns in backpacks and other travel gear.

When the coronavirus hit and schools were closed, those stories obviously stopped. Yet, during a full year of publishing K-12 gun-related stories, not once did we find schools that were responding to the “fix this” demands of students’ parents, some of whom wanted inaccessible borders around schools, locked entrances to school buildings, and other enhancements meant to protect students from those few mentally disturbed individuals who, like Nicholas Cruz, could open up on fellow students and teachers for whatever reason and, thus, extending the possibilities for future school shootings.

The point here is that, while nearly all gun control groups are quick to want new legislation to cover anybody with a gun, or those who want to buy one for self-protection, they’re looking in all the wrong places. The guns schools don’t want are already there by way of existing students’ backpacks and lockers. That those events still make for mainstream media coverage to tell the parents and school officials that the danger may lay within their own school walls, not outside of them.

All schools should have not just spoken or written regulations but metal detectors and, where necessary, Xrays to determine that guns don’t get past the front doors. Anything less should come draped in sure-to-follow letters from hungry lawyers who see guns in schools not as news but as opportunities.

Download
Our Mobile App

and get our latest news and featured videos instantly

Download Now

BREAKING :
The survivors of the Rancho Tehama shooting are suing the industry that they say allowed Kevin Neal to kill five people, and injure 18 others. After a domestic violence arrest, Neal was banned from having guns. So he built his murder weapons -- two homemade AR-15 style rifles called ghost guns. So-called ghost gun companies sell parts that can be assembled into these weapons. As long as those parts are 80% complete or less... normal gun laws do not apply.Moments after firing a gun for the first time, Alicea Burton proudly displayed the result of her marksmanship: a human silhouette target perforated with more than two dozen 9 mm holes.On the third anniversary of the tragic February 2018 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, President Joe Biden issued his administration’s first significant push for new gun control measures.It’s widely understood that the current occupants of the White House, the Biden-Harris Administration, have positioned themselves as the most anti-gun team this country has ever seen on Pennsylvania Avenue. Leading up to the 2020 election, NRA made abundantly clear the threats these two presented to law-abiding gun owners, and both the President and Vice President spelled out how deeply opposed they each are to the fundamental right to purchase, possess, and carry firearms for personal protection.TN Gov. Bill Lee is renewing his push to allow handguns to be carried in public without a permit, and local law enforcement leaders are pushing back with renewed opposition. Lee announced during his recent State of the State address that he will push again for the legislation, which failed to make it through the Tennessee General Assembly’s COVID-shortened session last year.