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BREAKING :
The survivors of the Rancho Tehama shooting are suing the industry that they say allowed Kevin Neal to kill five people, and injure 18 others. After a domestic violence arrest, Neal was banned from having guns. So he built his murder weapons -- two homemade AR-15 style rifles called ghost guns. So-called ghost gun companies sell parts that can be assembled into these weapons. As long as those parts are 80% complete or less... normal gun laws do not apply.Moments after firing a gun for the first time, Alicea Burton proudly displayed the result of her marksmanship: a human silhouette target perforated with more than two dozen 9 mm holes.On the third anniversary of the tragic February 2018 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, President Joe Biden issued his administration’s first significant push for new gun control measures.It’s widely understood that the current occupants of the White House, the Biden-Harris Administration, have positioned themselves as the most anti-gun team this country has ever seen on Pennsylvania Avenue. Leading up to the 2020 election, NRA made abundantly clear the threats these two presented to law-abiding gun owners, and both the President and Vice President spelled out how deeply opposed they each are to the fundamental right to purchase, possess, and carry firearms for personal protection.TN Gov. Bill Lee is renewing his push to allow handguns to be carried in public without a permit, and local law enforcement leaders are pushing back with renewed opposition. Lee announced during his recent State of the State address that he will push again for the legislation, which failed to make it through the Tennessee General Assembly’s COVID-shortened session last year.

GA/VA – GUN RIGHTS – NRA lawsuits come amid changing face of American gun owners

Babu Omowale says he needs the National Rifle Association – but only until he doesn’t. As the national firearms organization finds itself under existential threat, Mr. Omowale, the co-founder of the Huey P. Newton Gun Club in Dallas, is emblematic of a shifting gun-owning population in the U.S., some of whom say they do not identify with the NRA’s message. On the one hand, the NRA certifies gun owners in many states. But that narrow utility makes it expendable, especially for Black gun owners, whom the NRA has historically struggled to engage as members. “The NRA is just a political tool for us to be able to arm ourselves, but we don’t buy into the politics of any of it since it’s the right of every American to take advantage of [the Second Amendment],” says Mr. Omowale, who has joined armed rallies recently on behalf of Black rights. “I believe it’s time for [Black people] to start our own NRA.” As New York prosecutors aim to dissolve the NRA in a lawsuit alleging self-dealing and mismanagement, one thing is becoming clear to Mr. Omowale: Even as more Americans are exercising their Second Amendment rights, the NRA’s framing of that right as a conservative political ideal is losing potency. At a time when guns have marched to front and center of political debate, the NRA’s use of the Second Amendment as a political cudgel has run headlong against the growing diversity of the gun-owning public, many of whom tell pollsters they support some forms of gun control, including background checks for private sales – a longtime sticking point for the NRA. In that way, the NRA’s troubles are occurring at a time of shifting attitudes about the role of the Second Amendment in American life. The NRA’s “insularity is intimately connected with the ideological alignment … with politically conservative culture warriors,” says Wake Forest University sociologist David Yamane, founder of the Gun Culture 2.0 blog, in an email. Now, “the proliferation of gun clubs, groups and organizations representing diverse gun owners – [National African American Gun Association], A Girl and a Gun, Liberal Gun Owners, to name a few – fills the vacuum left by the NRA.”  [full article]

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BREAKING :
The survivors of the Rancho Tehama shooting are suing the industry that they say allowed Kevin Neal to kill five people, and injure 18 others. After a domestic violence arrest, Neal was banned from having guns. So he built his murder weapons -- two homemade AR-15 style rifles called ghost guns. So-called ghost gun companies sell parts that can be assembled into these weapons. As long as those parts are 80% complete or less... normal gun laws do not apply.Moments after firing a gun for the first time, Alicea Burton proudly displayed the result of her marksmanship: a human silhouette target perforated with more than two dozen 9 mm holes.On the third anniversary of the tragic February 2018 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, President Joe Biden issued his administration’s first significant push for new gun control measures.It’s widely understood that the current occupants of the White House, the Biden-Harris Administration, have positioned themselves as the most anti-gun team this country has ever seen on Pennsylvania Avenue. Leading up to the 2020 election, NRA made abundantly clear the threats these two presented to law-abiding gun owners, and both the President and Vice President spelled out how deeply opposed they each are to the fundamental right to purchase, possess, and carry firearms for personal protection.TN Gov. Bill Lee is renewing his push to allow handguns to be carried in public without a permit, and local law enforcement leaders are pushing back with renewed opposition. Lee announced during his recent State of the State address that he will push again for the legislation, which failed to make it through the Tennessee General Assembly’s COVID-shortened session last year.