Guns Didn’t Kill 59 People In Vegas. Media Did.

Bob Rogers

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 – It’s almost impossible to rationalize what Stephan Paddock did in Vegas. But we’ll try. Across the nation and ever since the death of soup kitchens following the 1932 Depression, Americans yanked themselves up by their bootstraps.  They did that because several female-led anti-alcohol liquor groups backed by their media cohorts pressured Congress to ratify what became the 18th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920 which prohibited the manufacture and sale of booze.

The result of the “we don’t need  alcohol” movement not only closed down liquor manufacturers and retail sellers but ignited the long fuse of unemployment which spread from booze makers, distributors and retailers to practically every other industry and caused massive unemployment among the masses. An explosion of gangland criminals based primarily in Chicago and New York spread murder and mayhem across the land and triggered a 15% deep dive in gross domestic product (GDP) stock prices that spread worldwide. It wasn’t until Franklin Delano Roosevelt used Prohibition repeal as his campaign for election as President of the United States that he pushed for – and Congress enacted – the 20th Amendment which outlawed the most devastating economic earthquake in American history which lasted until 1941 and the start of World War Two. During that 9-year period, crime flourished and became the scourge of the land.

On October 1st this year, Paddock’s mental connection to his life snapped.  While we still don’t know why this wealthy gambler was motivated to open fire on 22,000 people attending a concert, it’s easy to speculate that he simply felt that his life sucked, he decided to not only kill masses of people but add to the carnage his own suicidal ambitions. The immediate social result bereft of possibly the constant ringing in his head of America’s anti-gun movement drove him to unreasonably add to his collection of firearms maybe a dozen or more AR-15 rifles outfitted with bump stocks which allowed him to turn his arsenal of semi-automatic long guns into fully-automatic killing instruments.

Predictably, mass media leaped into action followed instantly by calls of anti-gun groups to launch yet another gun control campaign. Like the anti-liquor effort of the 1920s, Congress was urged to ban not just the bump fire accessory but guns overall, the ultimate goal of the contemporary gun prohibition movement. Then two things happened. Tens of thousands of AR rifle owners wanted in on the action; they wanted to equip their rifles with bump stocks. That resulted in an immediate run on the gun accessory followed just as fast by skyrocketing prices for something that would surely be banned practically overnight. Predictably, just as the anti-liquor juggernaut effort had shown, the criminal use of bump stocks became the new thrust of the anti-gun crowd and an aggressive effort by media and left-wing politicians to further push their civilian disarmament program.

One could count on two or three fingers the number of bump stock manufacturers in existence. Congress reacted by considering a ban on the product which would see, at first, minimal unemployment at the bump stock factories. That result, coupled with the already slowing sales trend of AR rifles made Marty Daniels, president of rifle maker Daniel Defense, to layoff at least a third of its 300 employees at its two plants in Georgia and South Carolina. Recalling the old axiom that a long journey begins with the first step, we’ve all been witness to the gun control media strategy of desk pounding for the elimination of guns. Gun Prohibition, if you will.

It will take time and lots of it before any practical effort to repeal the 2nd Amendment becomes visible. But you can bet your next meal of Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup that the prohibitionists of today are only marking time before Donald Trump leaves office clearing the way for an anti-gun president of the not-so-always-united United States of America.

Fortune Magazine’s Nina Easton and Michigan Senator Debbie Dingell On Gun Control: Bump Legislation Unlikely to Pass Discussed at the Most Powerful Women Summit 2017. 

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