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BREAKING :
The group New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence is teaming up with the Las Cruces Public Department to host a drive-thru gun buyback event this month. It is scheduled to be held Saturday, March 13 at the East Mesa Public Safety Complex at 550 N. Sonoma Ranch Blvd. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., according to organizers.Wyoming lawmakers will consider a new law allowing people with concealed carry permits to take guns into areas where firearms were previously prohibited, such as schools and legislative meetings. House Bill 117 and Senate File 67 would repeal gun-free zones in government meetings, public schools, public university buildings and professional athletic events. Only those with state-issued concealed carry permits would be legally allowed to carry guns in those areas.This year, the Transportation Security Adminstration (TSA) has added something new to its list of tips designed to help spring break travelers get through airport security quickly and without drama. In previous years, this advice has typically included general packing hacks on how to pack liquids, how to remove laptops and electronic devices for inspection and what not to pack in checked luggage.Baltimore is piloting a software program developed by Everytown for Gun Safety that will enable it for the first time to identify patterns of gun trafficking and illegal sales.Democrats have reintroduced gun sale background check legislation that requires unlicensed or private sellers to conduct a background check before selling a firearm. The Background Check Expansion Act introduced by Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., is co-sponsored by 43 Senate Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., while Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., has resurfaced a companion bill in the House.

INT’L – SELF-PROTECTION – She Stalked Her Daughter’s Killers Across Mexico, One by One

Miriam Rodríguez clutched a pistol in her purse as she ran past the morning crowds on the bridge to Texas. She stopped every few minutes to catch her breath and study the photo of her next target: the florist. She had been hunting him for a year, stalking him online, interrogating the criminals he worked with, even befriending unwitting relatives for tips on his whereabouts. Now she finally had one — a widow called to tell her that he was peddling flowers on the border. Ever since 2014, she had been tracking the people responsible for the kidnapping and murder of her 20-year-old daughter, Karen. Half of them were already in prison, not because the authorities had cracked the case, but because she had pursued them on her own, with a meticulous abandon. She cut her hair, dyed it and disguised herself as a pollster, a health worker and an election official to get their names and addresses. She invented excuses to meet their families, unsuspecting grandmothers and cousins who gave her details, however small. She wrote everything down and stuffed it into her black computer bag, building her investigation and tracking them down, one by one. She knew their habits, friends, hometowns, childhoods. She knew the florist had sold flowers on the street before joining the Zeta cartel and getting involved in her daughter’s kidnapping. Now he was on the run and back to what he knew, selling roses to make ends meet. Without showering, she threw a trench coat over her pajamas, a baseball cap over her fire engine-red hair and a gun in her purse, heading for the border to find the florist. On the bridge, she scoured the vendors for flower carts, but that day he was selling sunglasses instead. When she finally found him, she got too excited, and too close. He recognized her and ran. He sprinted along the narrow pedestrian pass, hoping to get away. Mrs. Rodríguez, 56 at the time, grabbed him by the shirt and wrestled him to the rails. She jammed her handgun into his back. “If you move, I’ll shoot you,” she told him, according to family members involved in her scramble to capture the florist that day. She held him there for nearly an hour, awaiting the police to make the arrest. In three years, Mrs. Rodríguez captured nearly every living member of the crew that had abducted her daughter for ransom, a rogues’ gallery of criminals who tried to start new lives — as a born-again Christian, a taxi driver, a car salesman, a babysitter. In all, she was instrumental in taking down 10 people, a mad campaign for justice that made her famous, but vulnerable. No one challenged organized crime, never mind put its members in prison.  [full article]

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BREAKING :
The group New Mexicans to Prevent Gun Violence is teaming up with the Las Cruces Public Department to host a drive-thru gun buyback event this month. It is scheduled to be held Saturday, March 13 at the East Mesa Public Safety Complex at 550 N. Sonoma Ranch Blvd. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., according to organizers.Wyoming lawmakers will consider a new law allowing people with concealed carry permits to take guns into areas where firearms were previously prohibited, such as schools and legislative meetings. House Bill 117 and Senate File 67 would repeal gun-free zones in government meetings, public schools, public university buildings and professional athletic events. Only those with state-issued concealed carry permits would be legally allowed to carry guns in those areas.This year, the Transportation Security Adminstration (TSA) has added something new to its list of tips designed to help spring break travelers get through airport security quickly and without drama. In previous years, this advice has typically included general packing hacks on how to pack liquids, how to remove laptops and electronic devices for inspection and what not to pack in checked luggage.Baltimore is piloting a software program developed by Everytown for Gun Safety that will enable it for the first time to identify patterns of gun trafficking and illegal sales.Democrats have reintroduced gun sale background check legislation that requires unlicensed or private sellers to conduct a background check before selling a firearm. The Background Check Expansion Act introduced by Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., is co-sponsored by 43 Senate Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., while Rep. Mike Thompson, D-Calif., has resurfaced a companion bill in the House.